5 Most Overrated Tech Specs of 2023 – LSB

Garima
8 Min Read


No, I’m not a technology pessimist.

On the contrarydear reader.

There are a bunch of new tech features that I’ve actually been gushing about lately thank you very muchincluding the iPhone 15 Pro action button, iOS 17 Name Drop and ChatGPT Plus’ “Make it More”.

However, there is something else specs released this year that made me scratch my head and think, “Why is this a thing?”

Without further ado, here are the most overrated specs of the 2023.

1. Pixel 8 Pro temperature sensor

One of the most anticipated features of the Pixel 8 Pro was the built-in thermometer.

Pixel 8 Pro

Pixel.8 Pro checks the temperature of a cup of coffee.
Credit: Google

The whispers about this temperature sensor grew louder as the Made by Google event neared its launch on October 4. However, when Google finally announced it, the search engine giant was quick to explain it as an object reader that can determine the thermals of your baby’s milk or a hot pan.

Waiting for what?

What about the leaked video showing a woman measuring her forehead temperature with the Pixel 8 Pro? Where is that a thermometer?

As it turns out, the Pixel 8 Pro’s temperature sensor doesn’t have FDA approval, so it’s not allowed to be sold as something that can be used on humans.

disgusting! Without FDA approval, the Pixel 8 Pro’s temperature is a bit deceiving.

2. Meta AI

Meta, formerly known as Facebook, debuted its new answer to ChatGPT (ie Meta AI) during the Meta Connect event. While OpenAI’s model can be imprecise and a little rough around the edges, you’ll thank your lucky stars for ChatGPT when you experience Meta AI.

Ray-Ban Meta Smart Glasses

Ray-Ban Meta Smart Glasses have Meta AI.
Credit: Meta

First, the social media giant added Meta AI to the new Ray-Ban Meta Smart Glasses, which officially started shipping on October 17. As someone who owns a pair, unfortunately, the Meta AI needs some work. While it works well at accepting voice commands, it’s not the best at answering questions.

SEE ALSO:

Ray-Ban Meta Smart Glasses Reviews are in — 3 Things People Hate About Them

In short, Meta AI is more like Siri than ChatGPT. However, to be fair, Meta AI is still in its infancy, so maybe in a few years it will mature into a more sophisticated model.

3. Persons

Meta AI is at the core of Personas, but I felt this crap needed a dedicated section. If the tech world could give out Razzie Awards, I’d give one to the weird AI avatars that Mark Zuckerberg shined a light on at Meta Connect.

Meta’s CEO touts these AI avatars as personal assistants, but they use the likeness of celebrities we know and love, including Snoop Dogg, Paris Hilton and Kendall Jenner.

SEE ALSO:

What are Meta’s AI Personas and how do you talk to them?

Target AI humans

The meta AI personas are too creepy for our taste.
Credit: Meta

Then, during the segment, Zuckerberg didn’t acknowledge that these were celebrities, calling Snoop Dogg’s AI avatar “The Dungeon Master.” Our theory is that Meta paid for image of these high-profile figures, but did not secure the rights to splash the names of the stars in the Meta AI product. (According to Business Insider, Meta has paid up to $5 billion to use the faces of these celebrities.)

Either way, if you’ve ever had the opportunity to interact with one of these Personas, you’ll find the whole experience to be strange—in Black mirror somehow. No thanks!

4. Windows 11 Copilot

The co-pilot sounds exciting on paper. When I first heard about it, I was on the edge of my seat to learn more. Copilot seems to be what all Windows users wish Cortana and Clippy were—a digital personal assistant that’s actually useful.

Windows 11 copilot

Windows 11 copilot
Credit: Microsoft

However, after using Copilot myself on Windows 11, I found it to be quite slow — too slow — at filling in the answers to my questions. Second, I was often disappointed with the results. Microsoft boasted that Copilot can provide you with the right recipes if you give it pictures of food. I put a picture of lasagna in the AI ​​chatbot; unfortunately he was unable to give a satisfactory answer.

Like Meta AI, Copilot is a fledgling AI model and I’m sure the engineers behind it put blood, sweat and tears into making it a knockout feature for Windows users. As it is now, it’s just not there yet.

5. Double Tap on Apple Watch

When Apple announced the Double Tap feature included in the Watch Series 9, the social media landscape was electrified with positive feedback about the feature.

Apple Watch Series 9

Mashable’s Stan Schroeder wearing the Apple Watch Series 9.
Credit: Stan Schroeder/Mashable

However, double tapping isn’t necessarily new. As DigitalTrends (and many users and accessibility advocates) have pointed out, Double Tap has been around since the Apple Watch Series 4, via an accessibility feature called Assistive Touch that helps you use the wearable if you have difficulty pressing buttons or touching the screen .

“I tested the AssistiveTouch feature on my first generation Apple Watch Ultra. The Double Pinch gesture is almost the same as what Apple showed for Double Tap,” said Christine Romero-Chan of DigitalTrends.

No it is not quite a lot Double Tap, a feature that’s a lot more complex (thanks to the S9’s neural engine), but it’s close enough. Interestingly, Mashable’s Crystal Bell and Stan Schroeder have the new Watch Series 9, but don’t use the Double Tap often.

Of course, Bell and Schroeder aren’t representative of all Apple users, but ease of use makes the case that Double Tap is lightly overexcited.

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